On this day – November 26

On this day in 1745, French officer Marin and his force of “22 officers, 23 cadets, 6 volunteers, 235 inhabitants, 90 Abenaki, 100 Iroquois-equal number from the Sault [Caughnawaga] and the Lake [Lake of Town Mountains]- 23 Nisissings, 16 Huron” for a total of about 520 men ran into an English hunting party with a small party of other Schaghticoke Indians in the vicinity of the carrying place at Fort Edward, their were English captured by Caughnawaga Indians and a Frenchman” (Boston News-Letter 1745), identified as Monsieur de Bailleul, in 1775, Alexander Hamilton wrote to John Jay, after an attack by a Patriot mob on James Rivington’s press in New York, “Though I am fully sensible how dangerous and pernicious Rivington’s press has been, and how detestable the character of the man is in every respect, yet I cannot help disapproving and condemning this step, “In times of such commotion as the present, while the passions of men are worked up to an uncommon pitch there is great danger of fatal extremes, the same state of the passions which fits the multitude, who have not a sufficient stock of reason and knowledge to guide them, for opposition to tyranny and oppression, very naturally leads them to a contempt and disregard of all authority;” in 1863, the 77th New York Infantry Regiment started the Mine Run Campaign, in Orange County, Virginia, was an unsuccessful attempt of the Union Army of the Potomac to defeat the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, it was marked by false starts and low casualties and ended hostilities in the Eastern Theater for the year; and in 1974, the formal transfer of ownership of 26.78 acres from Wheelabrator-Frye Inc. (subsidiary – A.L. Garber Company) to the National Park Service which is now known as Victory Woods.
On this day is a chronological timetable of events that occurred on this day in history around the Town of Saratoga. Discover what happened today in local history by following us on Facebook at https://ift.tt/2kLifwt
(Thank you to Deputy Historian Patricia Peck and Town Supervisor Thomas Wood for compiling information for this timetable.)
November 26

Saratoga Inspires the Nation

Once again the actions and commemoration of the Battles of Saratoga have been invoked to inspire the Nation.

As a reader of this blog, you are aware that the first United States official “Solemn Thanksgiving (day) and Praise” was as a results of the American Victory at Saratoga. The day was “to inspire our Commanders both by Land and Sea, and all under them, with that Wisdom and Fortitude which may render them fit Instruments, under the Providence of Almighty GOD, to secure for these United States the greatest of all human blessings, INDEPENDENCE and PEACE…”

Then today, 25 November 2020, a Thanksgiving Address was given by President-elect Joe Biden in Wilmington, Delaware

My fellow Americans:Thanksgiving is a special time in America. A time to reflect on what the year has brought, and to think about what lies ahead. The first national day of Thanksgiving, authorized by the Continental Congress, took place on December 18th, 1777. It was celebrated by General George Washington and his troops at Gulph Mills on the way to Valley Forge. It took place under harsh conditions and deprivations – lacking food, clothing, shelter. They were preparing to ride out a long hard winter. Today, you can find a plaque in Gulph Mills marking that moment. It reads in part – “This Thanksgiving in spite of the suffering-showed the reverence and character that was forging the soul of a nation.” Forging the soul of a nation. Faith, courage, sacrifice, service to country, service to each other, and gratitude even in the face of suffering, have long been part of what Thanksgiving means in America. Looking back over our history you’ll see that it’s been in the most difficult of circumstances that the soul of our nation has been forged. Now, we find ourselves again facing a long, hard winter.

As you can read, once again the actions in and commemoration of the Town of Saratoga, Battles of Saratoga, USS Saratoga, Saratoga National Historical Park, and the Gerald B. H. Solomon Saratoga National Cemetery are part of a legacy that have contributed to the shared American identity and an evolving sense of patriotism.

Wishing you a Happy Thanksgiving.

OTD: Henry Brockholst Livingston was born in 1757

#Onthisday in 1757 Battles of Saratoga veteran and Supreme Court Justice Henry Brockholst Livingston was born in New York City. A
publication called New York Geneology (accessed through http://www.fultonhistory.com) provided his war service:
His first experience was as a gentleman volunteer in a boat cutting-out expedition under his uncle, Colonel Lord Stirling, in Jan.,1776, when that officer captured the British transport Blue Mountain Valley Northern campaign,1776,1777, when he served as Aide to General Schuyler, and volunteer Aide to Generals St.Clair and Arnold.
”Under the latter he took part in the Battle of Freeman’s Farm,19 Sept.,1777, “prior to this engagement, he had been the bearer of despatches to Continental Congress, announcing the “signal victory” of Brigadier Stark at Bennington, 16 Aug.,1777; when it was proposed that Major Livingston, Aide to General Schuyler, who brought to Congress an account of the late success of Brigadier Stark, be presented with a commission of Lieutenant Colonel. Owing, however, to the requisite number of votes, required in cases of promotion, not being obtained, “the question was lost,” and it was, “after debate ordered to be expunged, and the matter referred to the Board of War.”
”New England dislike of General Schuyler was evidently here as on why the question of promotion was shelved on this occasion. Major Livingston also got into trouble with General Gates, owing to his championship of General Arnold, to whom he ascribed “the sole honour of our late victory, “that of the 19 Sept.'” He, therefore left the camp for Albany, on the twenty sixth of that month, to rejoin his old commander, General Schuyler, “Eight days later the Continental Congress promotes him to “the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel as a reward for his merit and services in the American Army.”
”He was granted leave of absence to accompany his brother-in-law, John Jay, as his private secretary, on his mission to Spain, 15 Oct., 1779. Returning to America he was captured at sea, 25 April, 1782, and confined in the provost at New York, until the arrival of Sir Guy Carleton a few days later, who at once released him on his parole.”
Henry Brockholst Livingston was the son of Governor William Livingston of New Jersey and was born on November 25, 1757. A classmate of James Madison, he graduated from Princeton in 1774. At the outbreak of the American War of Independence, Livingston joined the 3rd New York Regiment and participated in the siege of Ticonderoga. He served on the staff of General Philip Schuyler. Then he served as an aide to General Benedict Arnold in the Saratoga campaign, and witnessed British General John Burgoyne’s surrender of a complete army in 1777. In 1779, Livingston served on a diplomatic mission to Spain as private secretary to John Jay. On his return voyage, he was captured by the British. He was later paroled, whereupon he commenced his legal studies in the law office of Peter Yates in Albany.
Admitted to the bar in 1783, he practiced law in New York City from 1783 to 1802, and was a counsel for the defense in the landmark case of Rutgers v. Waddington (1784). Brockholst Livingston was appointed an Associate Justice of the New York Supreme Court of Judicature on January 8, 1802. During the years 1802 to 1806, he wrote 149 opinions, including a famous dissent in the fox hunting case of Pierson v. Post (1805).
On December 15, 1806, Henry Brockholst Livingston was nominated to the Supreme Court of the United States by President Thomas Jefferson. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on December 17, 1806, and served on the Supreme Court from then until his death. A recognized expert in maritime law, prize law and commercial law, he was considered one of the “silent” members of the Court.
Although he wrote few opinions, he was known for his scholarly observations, good humor and quick wit. He had a reputation for easing the tensions among the Justices that threatened to divide the Court.
In 1818, he was conferred with an LL.D. by Harvard College. Henry Brockholst Livingston died in Washington, DC, on March 19, 1823.
Saratoga has been defined by the people who by choice or by chance make up this community. There are many individuals like Henry Brockholst Livingston that help define this country and our community. It is the determination of our forefathers, in surmounting overwhelming odds that help define the American spirit – the will and ability to shape a better future. It is the people it is that define this community by choice or by chance have changed this country and even the world political development. That is why studying the people of Saratoga is integral to a good understanding of the condition of being human.

On this day – November 25

On this day in 1776, British Colonel Guy Johnson, Indian Superintendent in New York, reported to Lord Germain in England that the Indians had kept their promises to him of last year and that he had sent an officer in disguise to the Six-Nations; in 1783, it is evacuation day as thousands of loyal British subjects sail in a large flotilla from New York to Nova Scotia (and present-day New Brunswick) to form a new New England in British North America and New York City and the last British troops in the United States depart from Manhattan for Nova Scotia, while Guy Carleton remains in the city until October 4, ensuring that all who desire his protection can get away while the last shot of the American Revolutionary War was also fired on this day, as a British gunner on one of the departing ships fires a cannon at jeering crowds gathered on the shore of Staten Island; the shot fell well short of the mark, while the Rhode Island Regiment serves in Saratoga; in 1791, the first Baptist Church was organized in Schuylerville and in 1891, the Schuylerville Baptist Church celebrated their 100 years; in 1945, the Old Saratoga Reformed Church celebrated their 175th anniversary; in 1950, 85 mph winds in Schuylerville & vicinity caused widespread power outages, in 1955, the Knights of Columbus held a dinner dance; and in 2002, the rebuilding the dam on the old champlain canal was completed.
On this day is a chronological timetable of events that occurred on this day in history around the Town of Saratoga. Discover what happened today in local history by following our twitter account @historysaratoga
(Thank you to Deputy Historian Patricia Peck and Town Supervisor Thomas Wood for compiling information for this timetable.)
November 25

Hudson River Speedway

The Hudson River Speedway was a 1950’s stock car track was located beside the Hudson River and US 4 at Garnsey’s trucking. The Paul Garnsey family owned and ran the speedway. The Hudson River Speedway is an important part of our community’s 1950s landscape. The race track was located outside of the villages. Automobiles were the entertainment and the form the transportation to this social destination. In the post war recovery years, optimism pervaded the national attitude. Sports car racing was very popular with many tracks in Eastern New York and nearby Vermont. It is not known why the track ceases operations but American tastes changed. In late 1950s’, television sets had become affordable and with it less people venture out of their homes for entertainment. Times were good and people traveled. Automobiles began to reshape patterns of tourism. Riverside cottages and campsites multiplied as tourists took their vacations in the family car. The thrills of auto racing are no longer part of our community. It was a moment in time that was well thought of by the participants.

On this day – November 24

On this day in 1801, Philip Hamilton, the oldest son of Alexander and Elizabeth Hamilton, dies after a duel with George Eacker at Weehawken, New Jersey, in 1969, Jean Nolan was named Schuylerville village clerk, and in 2004, the Town of Saratoga Planning Board issued a special use permit to James & Elena Grotto for their Train & Hobby retail sales business on Route 29.
On this day is a chronological timetable of events that occurred on this day in history around the Town of Saratoga. Discover what happened today in local history by subscribing to our blog at https://ift.tt/2czXtwq
(Thank you to Deputy Historian Patricia Peck for compiling information for this timetable.)
November 24

Marker for the Schuyler Saw Mill

Faces and Places: Town of Saratoga Historian’s Photographic Archives
Title: Marker for the Schuyler Saw Mill on Bridge Street in Victory
The images contained in this digital Faces and Places collection document Town of Saratoga’s past through its villages, buildings, and events. They are drawn from the Town of Saratoga Historian’s Collection. The majority of these photos were taken by former Town Historian Thomas N. Wood or Deputy Historian Veronica Wood.* The images on Faces and Places collection are part of the Town of Saratoga Historian’s Photographic Archives. They are the property of the Town of Saratoga, which retains all right thereto. No publication or reproduction, electronic or otherwise, is allowed without the expressed permission of the Town of Saratoga Historian’s Office.* The collection is opened by appointment. You may contact us by e-mail at historiantosaratoga@gmail.com
The vast majority of the collections with Town of Saratoga Historian have been donated by many generous individuals and organizations throughout our community. We greatly appreciate such generosity and continue to rely heavily on this support in order to continue building collections for future generations. If you are interested in making a donation, contact us by e-mail at historiantosaratoga@gmail.com

Hudson River Speedway

The Hudson River Speedway was a 1950’s stock car track was located beside the Hudson River and US 4 at Garnsey’s trucking. The Paul Garnsey family owned and ran the speedway. The Hudson River Speedway is an important part of our community’s 1950s landscape. The race track was located outside of the villages. Automobiles were the entertainment and the form the transportation to this social destination. In the post war recovery years, optimism pervaded the national attitude. Sports car racing was very popular with many tracks in Eastern New York and nearby Vermont. It is not known why the track ceases operations but American tastes changed. In late 1950s’, television sets had become affordable and with it less people venture out of their homes for entertainment. Times were good and people traveled. Automobiles began to reshape patterns of tourism. Riverside cottages and campsites multiplied as tourists took their vacations in the family car. The thrills of auto racing are no longer part of our community. It was a moment in time that was well thought of by the participants.

On this day – November 23

On this day in 1775, Alexander Hamilton defends James Rivington’s press from a Patriot mob in New York City (five years later, he will marry General Schuyler’s daughter, Elizabeth) and General Montgomery writes, “till Quebeck is taken, Canada is unconquered,” Montgomery (who is under Schuyler’s command) concludes that an invasion of the city would be inevitable; in 1843, the USS Saratoga meets up the USS Perry along as a guest, Liberian Governor Joseph Jenkins Roberts off the coast of Africa; in 1864, the 77th New York Infantry Regiment Company K mustered out at Saratoga Springs to end the service to the Union, just three years after the day of its mustering in, the regiment of 105 men and 14 officers, all that returned of the 1,369 that had served with it, was received with all the love and honor a patriotic people could bestow, they were received by a series of speeches in the public hall, and were then treated to a splendid banquet, tendered by the citizens of Saratoga Springs, at the American hotel,” and Company K as returned to Schuylerville, after having marched through the streets, were given a collation by the ladies of the Reformed church; in 1943, USS Saratoga and USS Princeton rendezvoused on with the troop transports carrying garrison troops to Makin and Tarawa in the Pacific Theater of World War II and in 2009, the third meeting of the committee appointed to study village dissolution was held and elected Michael Fay and Wendy Lukas as co-chairpersons.
On this day is a chronological timetable of events that occurred on this day in history around the Town of Saratoga. Discover what happened today in local history by following us on Facebook at https://ift.tt/2kLifwt
(Thank you to Deputy Historian Patricia Peck for compiling information for this timetable.)
November 23

Give Thanks

Did you know that the first United States official was to give “Solemn Thanksgiving and Praise” as a results of the American Victory at Saratoga? The day was “to inspire our Commanders both by Land and Sea, and all under them, with that Wisdom and Fortitude which may render them fit Instruments, under the Providence of Almighty GOD, to secure for these United States the greatest of all human blessings, INDEPENDENCE and PEACE…” Huzzah to the first Thanksgiving and the efforts of our forefathers towards the American Victory at Saratoga in 1777.  Learn more at http://www.townofsaratoga.com