Old Champlain Canal

Faces and Places: Town of Saratoga Historian’s Photographic Archives Title: Old Champlain Canal viewed from Wilbur Road c.1988 This location has been improved into a multi-use canal towpath trail as a section of the Empire State trail.   The images contained in this digital Faces and Places collection document Town of Saratoga’s past through its villages, buildings, and events. They are drawn from the Town of Saratoga Historian’s Collection. The majority of these photos were taken by former Town Historian Thomas N. Wood or Deputy Historian Veronica Wood. The images on Faces and Places collection are part of the Town of Saratoga Historian’s Photographic Archives. They are the property of the Town of Saratoga, which retains all right thereto. No publication or reproduction, electronic or otherwise, is allowed without the expressed permission of the Town of Saratoga Historian’s Office. The collection is opened by appointment. You may contact us by e-mail at historiantosaratoga@gmail.com The vast majority of the collections with Town of Saratoga Historian have been donated by many generous individuals and organizations throughout our community. We greatly appreciate such generosity and continue to rely heavily on this support in order to continue building collections for future generations. If you are interested in making a donation, contact us by e-mail at historiantosaratoga@gmail.com
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Hudson River Speedway

The Hudson River Speedway was a 1950’s stock car track was located beside the Hudson River and US 4 at Garnsey’s trucking. The Paul Garnsey family owned and ran the speedway. The Hudson River Speedway is an important part of our community’s 1950s landscape. The race track was located outside of the villages. Automobiles were the entertainment and the form the transportation to this social destination. In the post war recovery years, optimism pervaded the national attitude. Sports car racing was very popular with many tracks in Eastern New York and nearby Vermont. It is not known why the track ceases operations but American tastes changed. In late 1950s’, television sets had become affordable and with it less people venture out of their homes for entertainment. Times were good and people traveled. Automobiles began to reshape patterns of tourism. Riverside cottages and campsites multiplied as tourists took their vacations in the family car. The thrills of auto racing are no longer part of our community. It was a moment in time that was well thought of by the participants.

Hudson River Speedway

The Hudson River Speedway was a 1950’s stock car track was located beside the Hudson River and US 4 at Garnsey’s trucking. The Paul Garnsey family owned and ran the speedway. The Hudson River Speedway is an important part of our community’s 1950s landscape. The race track was located outside of the villages. Automobiles were the entertainment and the form the transportation to this social destination. In the post war recovery years, optimism pervaded the national attitude. Sports car racing was very popular with many tracks in Eastern New York and nearby Vermont. It is not known why the track ceases operations but American tastes changed. In late 1950s’, television sets had become affordable and with it less people venture out of their homes for entertainment. Times were good and people traveled. Automobiles began to reshape patterns of tourism. Riverside cottages and campsites multiplied as tourists took their vacations in the family car. The thrills of auto racing are no longer part of our community. It was a moment in time that was well thought of by the participants.

On this day – October 23

On this day in 1746, a scouting party of thirty-three Indians and four Frenchmen, under M. Repentigny, stalked the road to Albany somewhere between Saratoga and Waterford, where they heard a great noise and discovered a great train of wagons escorted by several hundred troops bound for Fort Clinton (at Saratoga), the enemy stationed themselves near the road in a thicket and waited their chance, seeing a couple of carts somewhat separated from the rest they pounced upon the drivers, killed both of them, scalped one, and scattered in the woods before any one could come to the rescue; in 1775, the Congressional Committee meeting with Washington agrees to accept the Penobscot, Stockbridge, and St. John’s Indian tribes offers of assistance, allowing them to be employed in the Army (the Stockbridge Indians played an important role in the Battles of Saratoga) if necessary however the committee decides, however, to exclude African Americans; in 1782, Lieut. Colonel Dearborn (veteran of Sarstoga) wrote to Major Genl Lord Stirling (an American) from Saratoga “I have been honor’d with your Lordship’s favor of the 21st Instant, and attented to the directions therein given me, my scout has returned from Lake George but were not able to find Captain Prichard or his Boat, altho’ they searched every part of the Lake and Shores as far as Ticonderoga;” in 1794, Alexander Hamilton wrote to his sister-in-law Angelica Church, October 23, 1794, on quelling the Whiskey Rebellion, a protest against taxes on alchohol that “I am thus far my dear Angelica on my way to attack and subdue the wicked insurgents of the West,” in 1966, a fire destroyed home of Andrew & Jay Casey, in 1977, Walter S. Skoczylas passed away, he served as a PFC in the US Army WW 2; in 2004, the Maize Challenge was held at Schuyler Farms; and in 2012, the Veterans Memorial Bridge on Route 9p on Saratoga Lake was dedicated.
On this day is a chronological timetable of events that occurred on this day in history around the Town of Saratoga. Discover what happened today in local history by following us on Facebook at https://ift.tt/2kLifwt
(Thank you to Deputy Historian Patricia Peck for compiling information for this timetable.)
October 23

On this day – October 22

On this day in 1777, Abigail Adams wrote John Adams, “I believe I may venture to congratulate my Love upon the completion of his wishes with regard to Burgoin (Burgoyne) tis reported to day from many ways that he has with his whole Army fallen into our hands and tis said the post brings the same intelligence, if true, as I most sincerely hope, let us with gratitude acknowledge the interposition of Heaven in our favour;” in 1779, The New York Act of Attainder or Confiscation Act passed when the New York legislature declares Governor Lord John Murray Dunmore, General Wiliam Tryon, Oliver De Lancey, along with 57 others, to be public enemies which resulted with these individuals having their personal estates confiscated; in 1890, there were many cases of typhoid pneumonia in Victory, in 1947, Maynard Kirkpatrick was elected first Quaker Springs Fire Chief, and in 2001, the Schuylerville Central School Board of Education made plans to go ahead with the purchase of 1.77 acres of land formerly the site of Hadley apartments.
On this day is a chronological timetable of events that occurred on this day in history around the Town of Saratoga. Discover what happened today in local history by subscribing to our blog at https://ift.tt/2czXtwq
(Thank you to Deputy Historian Patricia Peck for compiling information for this timetable.)
October 22

OTD: Letter home from the Battles

On this day in 1777, Captain Christopher Marshall of the 10th Massachusetts Regiment wrote to his Wife, dated
“Albany, 21st October (1777)
“Our Regiment had the thanks of the Genll in Genll Orders for their ‘Spirited and Good Behaviour on the 19th September wherein it saved another Regt from falling into the hands of the Enemy or be Cutt off.”
According to two 19th century antiquarians, Marshall’s was sent out following the deployment of Learned’s Brigade. According to Charles Nielson, Marshall’s regiment was engaged on a rise of ground “west of the cottage,” with Learned’s Brigade.
A second author, William Stone, wrote that “Learneds & Marshall’s Regiments engaged toward the close of the battle of the 19th near Walker’s barn… situated a little east of the house, opposed by a Regiment of Grenadiers opposed to Marshall’s.” Both of these accounts suggest that the regiment was posted towards the interval between Hamilton’s center and Fraser’s right wing, by Freeman’s cabin and barn.
A more recent historian, John Elting, indicates that Marshalls’s regiment was likely deployd forward of the Bemis Heights works on the American Right, where they engaged elements of Riedesel’s command, “…Other patrols (apparently Indians, Canadians, and Loyalists) edged forward to feel out the American position. It may be one of these that touched off a brief noisy brawl when it followed a seldom-used bypath along the foot of the hills and got into the American entrenchments before being chased out – seemingly be Colonel Thomas Marshall’s 10th Massachusetts Regiment of Paterson’s brigade.”
Since most accounts of the battle place Riedesel in command of Brunswick troops, the determination that this patrol was under his command suggests that they were perhaps sent forward sometime shortly after the action resumed around three thirty in the afternoon, and that they moved towards the right of the line along the front of the American fortifications. This still leaves us with Christopher Marshall’s account to reconcile with the above evidence. When considered in light of the two nineteenth century accounts, it suggests that they moved up either to the right of Learned’s Brigade to relieve pressure by Acland’s grenadiers on Van Cortland’s 2nd New York, or to the left of Col. Brooks’ 8th Massachusetts, which was fighting a rear guard action against Breymann’s grenadiers and light troops. Shortly after Marshall’s regiment engaged the enemy, darkness fell and the action was soon broken off, with the Americans making an orderly retirement back to their camp. Since they came into the battle late in the day, the regiment’s casualties were fairly light, with at least two men killed and one wounded. Among the dead were Privates William Prebble of Thomas’ Company, and Richard Griffiths of Soper’s Company. Among the wounded was Elisha Munsell of Capt. Smith’s Company, a forty one year old shoemaker from Greenwich, Mass., who was shot through his left wrist. After being sent down to the General Hospital in Albany, he was transferred to Ephraim Minot’s Co. of the Corps of Invalids, where he performed various duties around Boston until he was discharged at the end of his enlistment.
Saratoga has been defined by the people who by choice or by chance participated in the Battles. It is the determination of our forefathers, including Colonel Marshall in surmounting overwhelming odds that help define the American spirit – the will and ability to shape a better future. It is the people it is that define this community by choice or by chance have changed this country and even the world political development. That is why studying the people of Saratoga is helpful in the understanding of the condition of being human.

On this day – October 21

On this day in 1864, Samuel J Mott passed away during his life he served 3 years as Town Supervisor and was a member of the Assembly in 1857; in 1873, the Visitation Church consecrated by Bishop McNierney, of Albany, at that time the church was described as a noble structure, an ornament to the town, and a credit to the congregation that worships in it; in 1955, a wallpaper expert visited Schuyler House; and in 1966, Stephen Mahay left for Peace Corps in India.
On this day is a chronological timetable of events that occurred on this day in history around the Town of Saratoga. Discover what happened today in local history by subscribing to our blog at https://ift.tt/2czXtwq
October 21