Schuylerville Welcomed a Voyageur Canoe Expedition

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This photo is of the 1996 ‘Montreal Connection Day” in the Village of Schuylerville on 15 July 1986. Schuylerville welcomed a voyageur canoe expedition with cheers and musket fire.  The expedition was led by two 26-foot Indian war canoes as part of the Albany Tricentennial celebration.  The canoeist retraced the trail of French-Canadian fur traders from Montreal to Albany.   The canoeist which included citizens from the United States, Canada, and the Mohawk nation were welcomed by Mayor Pat Geruso and Trusteee Kim Gamache.  The voyageurs spent the night camping at Fort Hardy (where Burgoyne’s army that invaded from Canada surrendered in 1777).  This photo is from the Gamache Scrapbook Collection.
Gamache Scrapbook Collection
Leneta E. Gamache  (21 Nov 1928 – 24 Feb 2017) was born in Hudson Falls, NY and grew up in Bald Mountain section of Greenwich, NY.  She married Joseph Gamache on 7 July 1946 and moved to Schuylerville, where she lived for 60 years.   She was active in many church and community activities.  She was employed at the Oneida Markets in Schuylerville then the Mary McClellan Hospital in Cambridge, NY. Her family was very important to her and she loved large family gatherings and took numerous pictures of every occasion.  These 14 scrapbooks from 1986 to 2002 focus on her son’s Kim Gamache term as Mayor of Schuylerville. Many of the photos were taken by Joseph Gamache.
The Gamache Scrapbook Collection is part of the Town of Saratoga Historian’s collection. The collection is opened by appointment.  You may contact us by e-mail at historiantosaratoga@gmail.com

 

The vast majority of the collections with Town of Saratoga Historian have been donated by many generous individuals and organizations throughout our community. We greatly appreciate such generosity and continue to rely heavily on this support in order to continue building collections for future generations.  If you are interested in making a donation, contact us by e-mail at historiantosaratoga@gmail.com

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On this day – July 13

On this day in 1777, Lieutenant Thomas Blake and the First New Hampshire Regiment, as part of Schuyler’s retreat of Ticonderoga arrived at Fort Miller and in 1931, the State abandoned the Champlain Canal in Schuylerville.

On this day is a chronological timetable of events that occurred on this day in history around the Town of Saratoga. Discover what happened today in local history by following our twitter account @historysaratoga

(Thank you to Deputy Historian Patricia Peck for compiling information for this timetable.)

July 13

Old Saratoga – New Schuylerville 1st Annual 18th Century Weekend

This photo from the Old Saratoga – New Schuylerville 1st Annual 18th Century Weekend on 10 August 1991. In this photo is Mayor Kim Gamache, Assemblymember Robert D’Andrea, his wife Theresa D’Andrea and Mayor Bruce Cornell from Victory. The photo is from the Gamache Scrapbook Collection. Gamache Scrapbook Collection Leneta E. Gamache (21 Nov 1928 – 24 Feb 2017) was born in Hudson Falls, NY and grew up in Bald Mountain section of Greenwich, NY. She married Joseph Gamache on 7 July 1946 and moved to Schuylerville, where she lived for 60 years. She was active in many church and community activities. She was employed at the Oneida Markets in Schuylerville then the Mary McClellan Hospital in Cambridge, NY. Her family was very important to her and she loved large family gatherings and took numerous pictures of every occasion. These 14 scrapbooks from 1986 to 2002 focus on her son’s Kim Gamache term as Mayor of Schuylerville. Many of the photos were taken by Joseph Gamache. The Gamache Scrapbook Collection is part of the Town of Saratoga Historian’s collection. The collection is opened by appointment. You may contact us by e-mail at historiantosaratoga@gmail.com The vast majority of the collections with Town of Saratoga Historian have been donated by many generous individuals and organizations throughout our community. We greatly appreciate such generosity and continue to rely heavily on this support in order to continue building collections for future generations. If you are interested in making a donation, contact us by e-mail at historiantosaratoga@gmail.com

Hudson River Speedway

The Hudson River Speedway was a 1950’s stock car track located beside the Hudson River and US 4 at Garnsey’s trucking.  The Paul Garnsey family owned and ran the speedway.   The Hudson River Speedway is an important part of our community’s 1950s landscape.  The race track was located outside of the villages.  Automobiles were  the entertainment and the form the transportation to this social destination.  In the post war recovery years, optimism pervaded the national attitude. Sports car racing was very popular with many tracks in Eastern New York and nearby Vermont.   It is not known why the track ceases operations, but American tastes changed.   In late 1950s’, television sets had become affordable and with it less people venture out of their homes for entertainment.  Times were good and people traveled. Automobiles began to reshape patterns of tourism. Riverside cottages and campsites multiplied as tourists took their vacations in the family car.  The thrills of auto racing are no longer part of our community.  It was a moment in time that was well thought of by the participants.  

On this day – July 12

On this day in 1804, Alexander Hamilton (Elizabeth Schuyler’s husband) died after a duel with the Vice President Aaron Burr; in 1895, the Scribner & Smith’s Enormous United Shows was at the Vandenburgh Lot in Schuylerville, the show include 3 bands of music, 100 thoroughbred hourse and 60 elegant acts.

On this day is a chronological timetable of events that occurred on this day in history around the Town of Saratoga. Discover what happened today in local history by subscribing to our blog at https://historianatsaratoga.wordpress.com/

July 12

OTD: Quaker Springs’ Traver and the 320th Glider Field Artillery was sent from the front lines after D-day

#onthisday in 1944, Quaker Springs’ Arthur Traver and the 320th Glider Field Artillery Battalion was revived from fighting after Normandy – D-day in World War II.
Quaker Springs’ Arthur Traver was part the 320th Glider Field Artillery Battalion arrived into battle at Normandy as part of D-day by glider on 6 June 1944. Poor visibility and low ceiling made air navigation extremely difficult. As a result, gliders were badly scattered for miles along the drop zone.
Traver describes that all the passengers on his glider were knocked out because of a rough landing. By 0930 the following day, only two howitzers were in action – one firing north and one firing south. By 8 June 1944, eight howitzers were firing in support of a coordinated offensive action undertaken by the 325th Glider Infantry Regiment. The 320th continued offensive operations supporting the 325th throughout this early campaign.
On 13 June 1944, the Battalion reinforced the gun fire of the 319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion in support of the crossing of the Douve River, made by the 508th PIR. It was relieved from action on 11 July 1944. By the time the 320th and the entire 82nd Airborne Division was pulled back to England, it had seen 33 days of bloody combat and suffered 5,245 paratroopers killed, wounded or missing.
The Division’s post battle report read, “...33 days of action without relief, without replacements. Every mission accomplished. No ground gained was ever relinquished.” As a result of its actions in OPERATION OVERLORD, the Battalion was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation and the French Croix de Guerre with Palm. The French Croix de Guerre with Palm is pictured in the graphic above. The unit citation reads “A crack unit that brilliantly distinguished itself during the dropping of the 82d Airborne Division over France in the night 5-6 June 1944. In spite of the stiff resistance of the enemy and its very heavy losses, it managed by its military qualities and the gallantry of its personnel, to occupy the important position of Saint Mere I’Eglise, thus making possible the success of the landing in strength of the Allied liberating troops.”
Arthur Traver was born to a farm family living on Burke Road in the Town of Saratoga. His mother, Mary Morehouse Traver was described as “a person with high ideals for herself, her family, and her community” passed away when Traver was 6 years old. His father, Humphrey Travers raised him and his brothers and sisters while running the family farm.
It is this early life experience of hardship and hard work that had an indelible impact on Traver’s commitment to his community and country. Arthur Traver was drafted into the US Army. He served in the 320th Glider Field Artillery Battalion of the 82nd Airborne Division during WW II. He fought in Italy, Normandy D-Day, Operation Market Garden, and Battle of the Bulge.
When he returned home from the War, he married Marie Hutchinson. He joined the Quaker Springs Volunteer Fire Department. He served the community in the fire department for 64 years and held various positions including Fire Chief. After the War, Traver started a 25 year career driving a school bus for the Schuylerville Central Schools.
In 1950, Arthur Traver and his wife Marie opened Art’s Service Station. Art’s Service Station served as a gas station, grocery store, Wheel Horse products dealer and social network in Quaker Springs. You can learn about Arthur Traver by visiting https://ift.tt/299E8LC
Saratoga has been defined by the people who by choice or by chance make up this community. There are many individuals like Arthur Traver that help define this country, our region, and this community. It is the determination of our forefathers, in surmounting overwhelming odds that help define the American spirit – the will and ability to shape a better future. It is the people it is that define this community by choice or by chance have changed this country and even the world. That is why studying the people of Saratoga is integral to a good understanding of the condition of being human.