On this day – August 16

On this day in 1777, John Stark, American Brigadier General and local militia forces defeat Brunswick Dragoon Lieutenant Colonel Friedrich Baum’s detachment of British General John Burgoyne army at Walloomsac, NY in the Battle of Bennington; Burgoyne had sent a detachment to Bennington to forage for much needed supplies; the Americans kill or capture nearly 1,000 of Burgoyne’s 7,000 troop invading army, further slowing British invasion plans, while Burgoyne is awaiting provisions from the excursion and has prepared to cross the Hudson, by way of a bridge of boats, British Lieutenant William Digby of 53d Regiment of Foot described, “our orders for marching were countermanded and others given out for us to move at 3 o clock next morning, as I was upon no particular duty, I rode back to the line who with were at Fort Miller and in the to our camp crossing over our of boats which was almost then finished, at night, I mounted an advanced picquet and to return to camp next morning at day break. Nothing extraordinary the night everything quiet about our post;” in 1780, British Lord Cornwallis decisively defeats the American General Horatio Gates (victorious General at Saratoga) and his American army at the Battle of Camden, SC and in 1924, the Marshall House, proclaimed as one of the principal historic attractions in the Revolutionary Saratoga area, in an ad published in The Saratogian.
On this day is a chronological timetable of events that occurred on this day in history around the Town of Saratoga. Discover what happened today in local history by subscribing to our blog at https://ift.tt/2czXtwq
August 16
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David Nevins Ladies Auxiliary from Victory Mills, NY are marching

Faces and Places: Town of Saratoga Historian’s Photographic Archives
Title: Town of Saratoga Day Parade c.1988
This was from the Town of Saratoga day parade (possibly from 14 August 1988) on Broad Street in the village of Schuylerville.  The David Nevins Ladies Auxiliary from Victory Mills, NY are marching by the reviewing stand.
The images contained in this digital Faces and Places collection document Town of Saratoga’s past through its villages, buildings, and events. They are drawn from the Town of Saratoga Historian’s Collection. The majority of these photos were taken by former Town Historian Thomas N. Wood or Deputy Historian Veronica Wood. The images on Faces and Places collection are part of the Town of Saratoga Historian’s Photographic Archives. They are the property of the Town of Saratoga, which retains all right thereto. No publication or reproduction, electronic or otherwise, is allowed without the expressed permission of the Town of Saratoga Historian’s Office. The collection is opened by appointment. You may contact us by e-mail at historiantosaratoga@gmail.com
The vast majority of the collections with Town of Saratoga Historian have been donated by many generous individuals and organizations throughout our community. We greatly appreciate such generosity and continue to rely heavily on this support in order to continue building collections for future generations. If you are interested in making a donation, contact us by e-mail at historiantosaratoga@gmail.com

On this day – August 15

On this day in 1836, Schuylerville purchased its first fire engine; in 1946, the USS Saratoga was struck from the Navy list after being used to test the effect of the atomic bomb on naval vessels; and in 1985, the Schuylerville Youth program left on a bus at 11:30 am for swimming trip at Hedges lake.
On this day is a chronological timetable of events that occurred on this day in history around the Town of Saratoga. Discover what happened today in local history by subscribing to our blog at https://ift.tt/2czXtwq
(Thank you to Deputy Historian Patricia Peck for compiling information for this timetable.)
August 15

Hudson River Speedway

The Hudson River Speedway was a 1950’s stock car track was located beside the Hudson River and US 4 at Garnsey’s trucking. The Paul Garnsey family owned and ran the speedway. The Hudson River Speedway is an important part of our community’s 1950s landscape. The race track was located outside of the villages. Automobiles were the entertainment and the form the transportation to this social destination. In the post war recovery years, optimism pervaded the national attitude. Sports car racing was very popular with many tracks in Eastern New York and nearby Vermont. It is not known why the track ceases operations but American tastes changed. In late 1950s’, television sets had become affordable and with it less people venture out of their homes for entertainment. Times were good and people traveled. Automobiles began to reshape patterns of tourism. Riverside cottages and campsites multiplied as tourists took their vacations in the family car. The thrills of auto racing are no longer part of our community. It was a moment in time that was well thought of by the participants.

Hudson River Speedway

The Hudson River Speedway was a 1950’s stock car track was located beside the Hudson River and US 4 at Garnsey’s trucking. The Paul Garnsey family owned and ran the speedway. The Hudson River Speedway is an important part of our community’s 1950s landscape. The race track was located outside of the villages. Automobiles were the entertainment and the form the transportation to this social destination. In the post war recovery years, optimism pervaded the national attitude. Sports car racing was very popular with many tracks in Eastern New York and nearby Vermont. It is not known why the track ceases operations but American tastes changed. In late 1950s’, television sets had become affordable and with it less people venture out of their homes for entertainment. Times were good and people traveled. Automobiles began to reshape patterns of tourism. Riverside cottages and campsites multiplied as tourists took their vacations in the family car. The thrills of auto racing are no longer part of our community. It was a moment in time that was well thought of by the participants.

Hudson River Speedway

The Hudson River Speedway was a 1950’s stock car track was located beside the Hudson River and US 4 at Garnsey’s trucking. The Paul Garnsey family owned and ran the speedway. The Hudson River Speedway is an important part of our community’s 1950s landscape. The race track was located outside of the villages. Automobiles were the entertainment and the form the transportation to this social destination. In the post war recovery years, optimism pervaded the national attitude. Sports car racing was very popular with many tracks in Eastern New York and nearby Vermont. It is not known why the track ceases operations but American tastes changed. In late 1950s’, television sets had become affordable and with it less people venture out of their homes for entertainment. Times were good and people traveled. Automobiles began to reshape patterns of tourism. Riverside cottages and campsites multiplied as tourists took their vacations in the family car. The thrills of auto racing are no longer part of our community. It was a moment in time that was well thought of by the participants.

Town of Saratoga Day Parade 1988

Faces and Places: Town of Saratoga Historian’s Photographic Archives
Title: Town of Saratoga Day Parade 1988
This was from the third Town of Saratoga day parade on 14 August 1988 at the reviewing stand at Fort Hardy Park.  The David Nevins Fire Department Auxiliary member is in the foreground.  The Town Board and Village Officials are wearing the blue shirts.  Supervisor Robert Hathaway is sitting on the left.
The images contained in this digital Faces and Places collection document Town of Saratoga’s past through its villages, buildings, and events. They are drawn from the Town of Saratoga Historian’s Collection. The majority of these photos were taken by former Town Historian Thomas N. Wood or Deputy Historian Veronica Wood. The images on Faces and Places collection are part of the Town of Saratoga Historian’s Photographic Archives. They are the property of the Town of Saratoga, which retains all right thereto. No publication or reproduction, electronic or otherwise, is allowed without the expressed permission of the Town of Saratoga Historian’s Office. The collection is opened by appointment. You may contact us by e-mail at historiantosaratoga@gmail.com
The vast majority of the collections with Town of Saratoga Historian have been donated by many generous individuals and organizations throughout our community. We greatly appreciate such generosity and continue to rely heavily on this support in order to continue building collections for future generations. If you are interested in making a donation, contact us by e-mail at historiantosaratoga@gmail.com