THE CAPTURE AT SARATOGA a poem

Here followeth the direful fate

Of Burgoyne and his army great,

Who so proudly did display

The terrors of despotic sway.

His power and pride and many threats 

Have been brought low by fort’nate Gates, 

To bend to the United States. 

   
 This is a pretty just account

Of Burgoyne’s legions’ whole amount, 

Who came across the northern lakes

To desolate our happy States.

Their brass cannon we have got all. 

Fifty-six—both great and small

And ten thousand stand of arms.

To prevent all future harms :

Stores and implements complete.

Of workmanship exceeding neat 

Covered wagons in great plenty,

And proper harness, no ways scanty. 

Among our prisoners there are

Six generals of fame most rare ;

Six members of their parliament 

Reluctantly they seem content

Three British lords, and Lord Balcarras 

Who came our country free to harass. 

From BALLADS AND POEMS RELATING TO THE BURGOYNE CAMPAIGN ANNOTATED B WILLIAM L. STONE, ALBANY, N. Y. JOEL MUNSELL’S SONS 1893
This poem is a work of historical poetry that is over 120 years old. It is not historic fact. Our historical understanding of the battles has evolved over the past 120 years. In writing a historical poem, poets have a slightly different responsibility than do historians. A modern historian is expected to present factually correct narratives. A poet who writes historical poems can adhere to this ideal, but may also use artistic license to communicate ideas beyond mere fact, such as mythical or emotional truths. Please enjoy this for what it is.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s